Table of Contents

What type of soil should I plant my fruit trees in?

Where should I plant my tree?

When is the best time to plant fruit trees?

How far apart should my trees be planted?

When should I fertilize my fruit trees?

Why do the leaves on my trees have a black coating?

What is causing the leaves on my Citrus trees to curl-up?

Why should I buy Grafted or Air-layered Fruit Trees?

My young fruit tree started to produce fruit, but most of it fell off.

 


What type of soil should I plant my fruit trees in?

A: Fruit trees require good drainage. We recommend that you mix half of the sandy soil from the hole you have dug with an equal amount of Top Soil. Use this mixture to fill in the hole around the root ball.

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Where should I plant my tree?

A: Fruit trees should be planted at least 15 feet away from any structure. They need to be planted on high ground to allow for drainage. Never plant them under power lines, and always check for buried utilities before you dig.

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When is the best time to plant fruit trees?

A: We recommend planting your trees in the early evening while the temperatures are cooler.

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How far apart should my trees be planted?

A: As a rule trees that will be regularly pruned and kept at a low height, can be planted 12 to 15 feet apart. If you are going to allow your trees to reach full adult size then you will need to consider the growing habits of each tree and space them accordingly. We recommend that trees be kept trimmed at 10 to 12 feet. This makes it easier to harvest the fruit, increases the amount of fruit the tree will yield, and provides room for more trees.

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When should I fertilize my fruit trees?

A:  Because of the sandy, nutrient poor soil in South Florida we recommend that you provide a more constant supply of nutrients for younger trees by offering a small amount every 4 to 6 weeks. However many people fertilize every three months. You may fertilize according to your preference. Larger well established trees will generally require less fertilizer. You should not fertilize between the months of November and February. This allows the trees to rest and have a dormant season. It also minimizes new growth that would be vulnerable to frost damage during the winter months. It is important that Fruit trees recieve a well balanced furtilizer with all of the specific macro and micro nurtients required for fruiting. The RFC has produced its own "Fruitilizer" specifically formulated for fruit trees.

How to purchuse "Fruitilizer" from the RFC

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Why do the leaves on my trees have a black coating?

A: This is called Sooty-mold, and is caused from insects that secrete a sweet, sticky honeydew that is promptly invaded by the sooty mold fungus.

Useful links:

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/mg441

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/mg442

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ch195

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What is causing the leaves on my Citrus trees to curl-up?

A: You have Leaf Miner. Leaf Miners are the larva of a moth that tunnels through young leaves causing them to curl and look unsightly. They do not cause any harm to the tree, and can be eliminated by spraying the young leaves with a spray containing Neem oil or fish oil, which is available at your local garden center. It has been recomended to spray new growth heavily for Leaf Miner two days before the full moon. This is because the Leaf Miner Moth is more active in the light of the full moon.

Useful Links:

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in165

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Why should I buy Grafted or Air-layered Fruit Trees?

A: Grafted and Air-layered trees have the adult hormones of the parent; therefore they will begin to produce fruit much sooner than a seedling. The fruit will also be identical to the parent tree. Many seedlings are not “true to seed” meaning that the fruit they produce will be different from the parent tree. You may have to wait many years for a seedling, to bear fruit and once they do finally produce fruit you may not like what you get.

How to get Grafted Fruit trees:

RFC Fruit Tree Sales

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My young fruit tree started to produce fruit, but most of it fell off.

A: This is normal for a young tree which is putting most of its energy towards growth. Some people will remove any fruit for the first two or three years to encourage rapid foliar growth. This helps to establish a strong vigorous tree that will be less susceptible to the stresses of disease and cold damage.

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